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Ljósafoss Hydro

About


The oldest power station on the River Sog, Ljósafoss began producing power for the city of Reykjavik in 1937. The plant made it possible for homes to stop relying on burning coal for cooking and at the same time, geothermal began to replace heating in the capital.

"Powering the Future" exhibition


Ljósafoss power station hosts a state-of-the-art interactive exhibition on-site called “Powering the Future” that is open to visitors all year round.

Energy Production


From the very beginning, a strong emphasis was placed on integrating power harnessing plans and environmental protection so that the natural environment and nature conservation would be given full consideration.

Research & Preparation

Preparation work and research on the sustainable utilisation of geothermal energy at Theistareykir began all the way back in 1999. The land utilisation and protection plan for the Theistareykir area was developed in cooperation with the municipalities and energy companies. Following the publication of a thorough environmental impact assessment report and subsequent exploratory drilling and resistivity measurements, the construction of the power station began in 2015.

Safety at the Forefront

Landsvirkjun is a leading company in the matters of health and safety. Landsvirkjun adheres to a zero-accident policy, the basis of which is to develop a strong safety culture amongst employees to actively prevent accidents. An effective zero-accident policy is achieved by employee involvement in the workplace, adherence to the policy and putting individual safety and the safety of others first.

History


The Germans might have branded and brought the term Energiewende into the global vocabulary. But when Iceland started, nobody was thinking about it. The energy transition from carbon based fuels to renewables began over 100 years ago. It started off slowly with hydro powering just the lights but fully took off when Ljósafoss power plant began producing power for the city of Reykjavik in 1937. The plant made it possible for homes to stop relying on burning coal for cooking and at the same time, geothermal began to replace heating in the capital.